2018年
04月09日

Endings and Beginnings

Endings and Beginnings

by Lyn Swierski

 

I am writing this a few days after the new Class of 2022 thundered down the aisle, into the school gymnasium, to celebrate their Entrance Ceremony on April 2nd.  Only two weeks earlier, the graduating Class of 2018, marched slowly down the aisle in their caps and gowns in graceful precision, a beautiful sight to see.  It is amazing to attend these two events so close together. We watch the mature young women we have spent four years with, walking out into the world with their heads held high, holding onto their diplomas, symbols of the knowledge and experience they have gained from their time in university.  Then, soon after, to fill the void, there is a fresh group of young students, most of whom have just finished high school, all in their crisp suits and heels, new to each other, and unsure about this unfamiliar place called Notre Dame Seishin University. I smile at how the new students rush into the gym, and in my mind's eye I can already picture them four years from now, standing straight and looking elegant, slowly marching out the door. 

The recent graduates I've grown close to, especially those members of the English Drama Club that I direct, and the members of my seminar group, are precious to me.  These new students cannot take their places.  But life is cyclical, and there are few places that illustrate that aspect of life better than a school. March and April are two months that stand out in that way.  We say goodbye to students we have watched and helped to grow, and we open the door to a new group, and trust that wonderful things lie ahead for them in the next four years.  It's a beautiful cycle that teachers get to witness every year.  



 

 船橋に(1)のような交通安全ポスターが貼ってあったそうです。下線部に注目!

   (1)  こっち見るなっしー! 前見て運転するなっしー!

       (2014年10月10日)

       http://john173.blog.fc2.com/blog-entry-227.html

ツイッターを "みんな見るなっしー" で検索してみました。検出例の1つが(2)です。

   (2)  このあとすぐ、NewsZEROにふなっしーが出るよー みんな見るなっしー

 (2014年7月14日)

https://twitter.com/search?q=%22%E3%81%BF%E3%82%93%E3%81%AA%E8%A6%8B%E3%82%8B%E3%81%AA%E3%81%A3%E3%81%97%E3%83%BC%22&src=typd

 

 (1)と(2)の下線部は、発音は同一ですが、意味は否定・肯定に関して逆です。(1)では「見ない」ように、(2)では「見る」ように、促しています。

 (1)では、もともと「な」が2個連続していたものが1個省略されているのです。このように、同じ音が2個連続するとき1個が省略される事象を、haplology(ハプロロジー、重音脱落)といいます。

   (1)   見るな + なっしー →  見るななっしー → 見るっしー

   (2)   見る + なっしー             → 見るなっしー

 

 次は、新聞の切り抜きです。政治家2名の提唱する経済政策について解説しています。この紙面にhaplologyの例が見られます。 

ノミクス(朝日新聞)

『朝日新聞』2012年1月9日朝刊

  (3)         エダノ(枝野幸男) +ノミクス → エダノノミクス → エダミクス

  (4)       マエハラ(前原誠司)+ノミクス           → マエハラノミクス

 

 Haplologyは、なぜ起こるか?また、どんな場合に起こるか? 同音連続のある種のものは言いにくく、haplologyはそれを解消するために起こります。したがって、同音連続の言いにくい事例において起こります。上にあげた例は、理屈に従えば「見るななっしー」「エダノノミクス」のほうこそ正しいはずなのだが、実際に発音してみると変な感じがします。

 ふなっしーの例は、特に変わっています。ここでは、haplologyは、逆の意味に取られかねないという不都合をもたらします。にもかかわらず起こります。分かりやすさより言いやすさが優先されるわけです。

 

 ここまでで、Haplologyが起こることがある、ということは分かった。では、どのくらいの人数の人にとって起こるのだろうか? ふなっしーの例について、本学の授業でアンケート調査を行って調べました(2017年12月)。

 次の質問票を使用しました(一部分を抜粋)。6つの文 ―3つの場合(1)(2)(3)に対してそれぞれ2とおり(a)(b)の言い方― を回答者自身が言うか・言わないか、質問しています。

質問票「(ナ)ッシー」

調査結果を、グラフに示します。数字は「言う」という回答の数(%)です。

調査結果「~(ナ)ッシー」

調査参加者は45名でした。このグラフでは、45名のうち(1b)「ダメッシー」とは言わないと回答した34名について集計してあります。(なお、残りの11名は、(1b)を(まれにだが)言うと回答。この人たちは、「ナ」を含まない「ッシー」という別の語尾を、加えて持っていると考えられます。)

 

 グラフから以下のことが読み取れます。

 (1)は、同音の連続とは無関係である場合です。(a)「ナッシー」という語尾は(ふなっしーのまねをするとすれば)ほとんど全員が使います(97%)。

 これに対し、(2)(3)は、「ナ」で終わる語に「ナ」で始まる語尾が続く場合です。(a)「ナッシー」をそのままで付ける人は約3分の2(68%, 63%)に止まります。(b)「ナ」を1個省く人は1/3以上(34%, 41%)います。つまり、haplologyが1/3強の人数の人にとって起こっていることになります。

 (2)と(3)の相違を見ましょう。(2)では、(b)のようにhaplologyを起こすと、逆の意味(邪魔しなさい!邪魔しよう!)で解されかねません。一方、(3)の(b)では、その心配はありません。調査結果を(2b)から(3b)への方向で見ると、少数(7%)の違いだが、「ナ」を1個省く人数が増えます。つまり、1割弱の人たちが、言いやすさより分かりやすさを尊重し、(2)ではhaplologyを控えているのだ、と考えられます。

 

 haplologyの働きは、私たちが気がつかないないうちに、私たちの普段の言い方を変えていっているのです。

2017年
11月15日

Fresh Eyes│Kate Bowes

Marcel Proust, a famous French writer, once wrote that "The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new lands but seeing with new eyes."

 

I think about that line a lot as a teacher of International Communication. What is it that we can discover by training ourselves to look at our lives with a different kind of attention? Many amazing details of our daily lives are lost in routine. For instance, things we do everyday don't seem to be very exciting or noteworthy. We wake up, we eat, we go to school, we go to club, come home, eat, do homework, bath, sleep. But you can and should make time to think about your life and to try to see it with new eyes.

 

I mean: what do you do everyday? What do you eat for breakfast? How do you get to school? Who do you meet--on the bus, the train, at school? What is your neighborhood like? Do you live in the hometown of one of your parents? Have you family (relatives) who live near you? What kind of place do you live in?  Do you live close to nature or in a city? What do you like about where you live? Do you know how to cook? To paint or draw? To arrange flowers, play a musical instrument, or sing, or dance? How did you learn these things? Look at the people around you. What do they look like? What do they like? What is interesting and lovable about them, in your opinion? Look around you and really try to see . . . and be grateful for what is good.

 

Our late, great Sr. Kazuko Watanabe famously said: "Bloom where you are planted." To me that means being able to feel at peace with where I am; to stand tall and to be bright, to absorb the sunshine, yes, and also feel the rain: to be alive to all that is around me. I try, therefore, to pay attention in the place I am, to really see what lives around me. There are, indeed, many discoveries to be made!

 

I also think about 'fresh eyes' when I am interviewing students who hope to study abroad. I want to know that they are able to communicate in a foreign language, of course, but I am also listening to whether they have something worthwhile to say; whether they are aware of their daily lives. Study abroad is always, at least partly, a matter of cultural exchange. You must be able to give and take in these inter-cultural conversations and by looking at your life, you will certainly be prepared to enjoy opportunities to share!

 

I recommend that you keep a journal. If you dream of studying abroad someday, I'd encourage you to keep it in English. It doesn't matter if you make mistakes, but doing this will help you to develop both your cultural awareness and your language skills.

Kate Bowes

reader by Greg Tsai  CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 (Flickr) 3-31-2017

子どものころ、本屋に入ると一冊だけ好きな本を買ってもらえるという我が家のルール(?)があって、商店街の小さな本屋に寄るのがとても楽しみでした。岩波少年文庫の『星のひとみ』もそうして出会った一冊で、それは、初めて夢中になって繰り返し読んだ「外国のお話」でした。ラプランドやヴァドセーといった土地の名、オーロラ、トナカイの引く橇、雪の中で拾われた赤ちゃんがその目の輝きから「星のひとみ」と呼ばれ、やがて何もかもを見通してしまうが故に疎まれて地下に閉じ込められてしまうこと―自分のいる場所とは何もかも違う世界を前に、ドキドキしていたことを覚えています。

 

先日ふとこの本を思い出し、もう手元になかったので改めて買ってみました。そして、今回初めて(子どもの頃には読まなかった)巻末の「訳者のことば」に目を通し、作者がザクリス・トペリウスというフィンランド人で、『星のひとみ』は19世紀にスウェーデン語で書かれた童話集であることを知りました。日本語版の初版は1953年で、今から60年以上前に翻訳されていたこともわかりました。

 

『星のひとみ』をきっかけに、多くの海外の児童文学作品を読みました。イギリスやアメリカ、ソ連、イタリア、ドイツ......そういった国々の作品が、私にはすべてひっくるめて「外国のお話」で、そこに出てくる風景やら料理やらを想像し、その世界に身を置くことが、楽しくて仕方なかったように思います。そんなふうに楽しめたのは、それらが日本語で書かれていたからで、つまり、私に初めての異文化体験をもたらしてくれたのは、それぞれの作品の翻訳者の方々だったのだと、『星のひとみ』の訳者である万沢まきさんの「訳者のことば」(平易な言葉で、フィンランドの歴史や地勢、北欧神話などにも触れられた素晴らしい解説です)を読みながら、改めて思い至ったのでした。

 

英語圏の小説を原文で味わう楽しさ、奥深さを知り、それが仕事の一部になった今も、私は翻訳作品をあれこれと読んでいます。そもそも私の場合、英語以外の外国語で書かれていたらお手上げなので、翻訳に頼る以外にないのですが。でもこの、いわば「原文と自分の間にもう一人立って」いて、その人の言葉を全面的に信頼して読み進める感覚が、私はとても気に入っています。自分一人では見えない世界を、外国語(と、それが内包する歴史や文化)をていねいに学んだ誰かが日本語にして見せてくれる。その誰かのおかげで、様々な異文化を、異世界を、「母語で」読み、感じ、想像することができる。幸せなことだと思います。

 

最近では、フランスとロシアの女性作家の作品に加えて、韓国と台湾の作家の短編集も読みました。旅行で見るのとは一味も二味も違う景色が、文学の中に豊かに広がっています。読書の秋、みなさんも本を開いて、異国を旅してみませんか。

上段は台湾と韓国の作家の短篇集、下段左はロシアの作家の小説

Trick-or-treat!

The English Department here at NDSU is happy to announce our library display this fall will be on Frankenstein.  Please come by and enjoy.

 

 

Frankenstein (1818) is the most widely published English novel of all time.  It is also the most widely read work of fiction in English language universities and colleges (Chaucer's Canterbury Tales comes a close second).  The author, Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (born Mary Godwin), was only 19 when she began to write her gothic horror classic.

Mary Shelley (posthumous portrait)

(ca. 1851-1893) by Reginald Easton

 

 "Let's tell a ghost story . . ."

In 1816, 19-year-old Mary Godwin was spending time at Lake Geneva in Switzerland with her future husband, the British Romantic poet Percy Bysshe Shelley, along with a few other guests.  They had been reading a collection of German ghost tales, and their host, the British Romantic poet Lord Byron, suggested a contest to see who could tell the scariest story of their own.  Mary listened to others tell their tales, and later her story, Frankenstein, came to her in a "dream vision" later that night as she slept.

Frankenstein; or, The New Prometheus is the story of a doctor, Dr. Frankenstein, who creates a new being out of dead body parts that he steals from freshly dug graves.  He attaches these parts together, and then he shocks his creature into life with electricity.  The subtitle of the novel, "The New Prometheus," refers to a Greek legend in which Prometheus creates humankind out of clay.

  "Frankie Goes to Hollywood"

A number of screen adaptations have been made of Mary Shelley's famous horror novel.  The most famous remains the 1931 version produced by Universal Pictures, starring Boris Karloff as Frankenstein's monster.  Today, largely because of Hollywood, we think of "Frankenstein" as the monster.  In Shelley's novel, however, "Frankenstein" refers only to the creator of the monster, Dr. Frankenstein, not the monster himself.

 

 

"Frankie Wants a Wife"

In 1935, Universal Pictures released The Bride of Frankenstein, again starring Boris Karloff, with Elsa Lanchester as his bride-to-be.  The movie develops the desire for companionship and understanding that Mary Shelley's monster desperately and violently seeks.